Sisterhood, the Blog

Sacred Space for 21st Century Women

Fathers and Daughters on July 31st Episode of The Ananda Leeke Show on Talkshoe.com

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Ananda Leeke and her  father Dr. John F. Leeke affectionately

known as “J” hanging out in Adams Morgan in DC

 

Join Sisterhood, the Blog founder Ananda Leeke for a juicy conversation with her father Dr. John F. Leeke (a/k/a “J”) about fathers and daughters on the July 31st episode of The Ananda Leeke Show at 8:00 p.m. EST on Talkshoe.com. Click here to listen to the show:  http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/15820.  They will discuss how their father-daughter relationship has impacted her life choices, creativity, and career. 

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They will also share their thoughts about the book, Daughters of Men: Portraits of African-American Women and Their Fathers (http://www.daughtersofmen.com) by Rachel Vassel.  Ananda recently gave this book to her father for his 70th birthday.  It’s one of his favorites!

If you miss the show, don’t panic. You can download a recording to your computer or via iTunes a few minutes after the show airs or whenever you have free time.  Click here to download a recording:  http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/15820.

What is your relationship with your father?

How has your father impacted your life choices and career?

Enjoy your day and weekend!

July 31, 2009 Posted by | Ananda Leeke, Creativity, Fathers and Daughters, The Ananda Leeke Show | , , , | Leave a comment

Welcome to Sisterhood, the Blog

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Welcome to Sisterhood, the Blog! 

Happy International Women’s Day on March 8th!

International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8th of each year. It honors women’s economic, political and social achievements. International Women’s Day was first celebrated in 1911. For more information, visit www.internationalwomensday.com.

Sisterhood, the Blog is sacred space for twenty-first century women to explore self-discovery through sisterhood connections and communities, spirituality, self-care, self-expression, storytelling, social media, and social justice advocacy.

Sisterhood, the Blog will offer twenty-first century women a road map on how to creatively plug into online and offline practices, tools, experiences, and communities that encourage them to maximize the quilt of infinite possibilities they have inherited from the women’s rights, spirituality, self-help, and technology movements.

Sisterhood, the Blog will  launch in June 2009 with the following Sisterhood, the Blog social media projects:

-Facebook Group

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=23050254985

-Twitter

http://www.twitter.com/sisterhdtheblog

-Radio Show 

http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/42015

-YouTube Channel 

http://www.youtube.com/sisterhoodtheblog

 

Until then, read the twenty-first century women’s manifesto below and let us know what you think. 

Twenty-First Century Women’s Manifesto by Ananda Leeke

Copyright 2009 by Madelyn C. Leeke

(Excerpt from That Which Awakens Me: A Woman’s Poetic Memoir of Self-Discovery by Ananda Leeke – published by iUniverse, Inc. in Spring/Summer 2009)

Women living in the twenty-first century are the beneficiaries of four movements that have defined and expanded their individual and collective power of choice. These movements include women’s rights, spirituality, self-help, and technology. The women’s rights movement empowered women to:

  • claim, demand, and exercise their equal rights in all facets of society;
  • live their lives on their own terms;
  • document and educate themselves and others about their experiences, accomplishments, and history through art, literature, music, film, and other forms of cultural expression; and
  • establish organizations, coalitions, and campaigns that advocate their interests and concerns.
 
The spirituality movement expanded the types of religious experiences and sacred practices women use to honor and nurture their spirits. The self-help movement provided a portfolio of tools women utilize to define, love, understand, accept, heal, and reinvent themselves emotionally, psychologically, and physically.  The technology movement increased women’s capacity to:
  • communicate and maintain relationships in the midst of their busy lives with the support of e-mail, voicemail, cellular phones, and text messaging;
  • document and tell their life stories with social media tools such as blogs, Twitter, Utterli, Flickr, and YouTube;
  • connect with like-minded people for support, sharing moments, and professional networking in online communities such as Blogher, Facebook, Myspace, LinkedIn, Ning.com, and CollectiveX;
  • become members of local Meetup.com interest groups that interact offline;
  • expand their pool of eligible dating and life partners with support from online dating sites;
  • distribute original content with social bookmarking tools such as AddThis, reddit, StumbleUpon, and Delicious;
  • create and participate in Internet-based radio and television programs;
  • launch businesses and nonprofit organizations;
  • obtain and barter housing, services, and goods on Craigslist.com and other sites;
  • publish books, e-zines, and other publications;
  • conduct e-commerce and solicit donations with Paypal.com and other tools;
  • identify and secure new careers with employment web sites; and
  • spearhead and actively participate in advocacy efforts, political campaigns, and other movements.
When the threads of these four movements are woven together, they become a quilt of infinite possibilities women can use to create a personal manifesto that declares their intentions on how to design, live, and celebrate their lives in the twenty-first century.  A sample twenty-first century women’s manifesto is included below.  Use it as a template for creating your own. 
Twenty-First Century Women’s Manifesto
As a twenty-first century woman, I accept and use my indvidual and collective power of choice to:
1) give thanks to everyone who made it possible for me to live and choose freely;
2) live life on my own terms; 
3) honor the divine spark within my spirit, everyone, and everything in the universe;
4) participate in religious experiences and/or sacred practices that honor and nurture my spirit;
5) embrace and use self-help and self-care tools to support myself emotionally, psychologically, physically, and creatively; and
6) utilize technology to enhance my capacity to communicate, connect with others, build community, share information, express my creativity, launch businesses, and advocate for and participate in causes and campaigns.  

March 5, 2009 Posted by | Creativity, Feminism, Practices, Self-Discovery, Tools | 3 Comments